Episode 1.8: The Preservation of Scripture

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What are the “autographs” of Scripture? If we don’t have the original writings how can I be certain I have the Word of God? Should I learn the original languages? What is textual criticism? What are some different theories of translation? What rights do I have as a Christian? These are some of the important questions we answer on today’s episode. Join Kyle, Nathan, Shawn, and Joel as we discuss the sufficiency of the Bible from Westminster Confession of Faith 1.8:

The Old Testament in Hebrew (which was the native language of the people of God of old), and the New Testament in Greek (which, at the time of the writing of it, was most generally known to the nations), being immediately inspired by God, and, by His singular care and providence, kept pure in all ages, are therefore authentical; so as, in all controversies of religion, the Church is finally to appeal unto them. But, because these original tongues are not known to all the people of God, who have right unto, and interest in the Scriptures, and are commanded, in the fear of God, to read and search them, therefore they are to be translated in to the vulgar language of every nation unto which they come, that, the Word of God dwelling plentifully in all, they may worship Him in an acceptable manner; and, through patience and comfort of the Scriptures, may have hope.

For More Resources On Today’s Topic Check These Books Out:

Post Reformation Dogmatics by Richard Muller

Inspiration, Inerrancy, and Preservation” by James White

“The Preservation of Scripture” by R.C. Sproul

And also…

An Examination of the Council of Trent by Martin Chemnitz

Disputations on Holy Scripture by William Whitaker

Taking God At His Word by Kevin DeYoung

Thy Word is Truth by E.J. Young

Thy Word is Still Truth ed Peter Lillback

From the Mouth of God by Sinclair Ferguson

The Final Word by O Palmer Robertson


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